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Homebrew Projects to Tackle While We Wait

Homebrew Projects to Tackle While Social Distancing
Since going out for a beer simply isn’t an option right now. ( Please support local breweries by ordering delivery online, if you’re comfortable with it!) But, it’s a great time to make your own beer.
Open up that kit that’s been sitting in the closet gathering dust or order everything required by online delivery — and while you wait for gumption, inspiration, or shipping, Vinepair has plenty of reading recommendations to keep you occupied, too.
Via Vinepair

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Does Your Homebrew Taste Like Homebrew?

Four Reasons Your Homebrew Tastes Like Homebrew (and How to Prevent It)
The best part of being a homebrewer is sharing your beer. But, if you’ve noticed your friends don’t finish their pints, or give it a generic, “It’s good!” for feedback, you may be making one of these very common mistakes. Here are four reasons your homebrew might be subpar, and what you can do about it.
Via Vinepair

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Iron Hill Brewery Invites Homebrewers to ‘Brew with a Legend’

Registration for Regional Beer Competition Opens on Monday, October 28th
Iron Hill is launching Brew with a Legend, a regional beer competition where homebrewers will vie for the opportunity to brew their signature recipe with craft beer pioneer and Iron Hill’s co-founder, Mark Edelson.
Via Iron Hill Brewery

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AHA Big Brew May 4th

National Homebrew Day was designated by Congress May 7th in 1988. The American Homebrewers Association (AHA) created the Annual Big Brew event to celebrate National Homebrew Day around the world. Big Brew happens each year on the first Saturday in May. Anyone can host a Big Brew event, so invite your family and friends, and join in the global celebration.

Don’t miss the simultaneous toast at 1:00 p.m. ET, 12:00 p.m. CT on May 4, 2019!

Join the celebration and attend a nearby event: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/aha-events/national-homebrew-day

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What Is the Solera Brewing Method?

Imagine barrels of beer, stacked as far as the eye can see, row upon row of wooden casks tenderly nurturing their contents as they age over years. It’s a lovely image, isn’t it? Now imagine that–every once in a while–your friendly neighborhood brewer cracks open the eldest barrels of their generation, drains portions of their liquid bounties, and then tops them off with beer from the adolescents of the bunch. The drained beer is bottled. The elder barrels get a shot of youthful vigor in the arm. The adolescent barrels get a top off from the older barrels. The brewer’s thirsty patrons top off their glasses. The circle of barrel-aging beer life continues. Everybody’s happy.

Via www.hopculture.com

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It’s that time of year again! No, not Halloween, “Learn to Homebrew Day!”

Press release from AHA:

November 3rd is the 20th Annual ‘Learn to Homebrew Day’

Beginner, Hobbyist and Professional Brewers from All Over the World to Participate

Boulder, Colo • October 23, 2018—On November 3, the American Homebrewers Association®(AHA)—which this year is celebrating its 40th anniversary—hosts the 20th annual Learn to Homebrew Day, an opportunity for homebrewers to draft their non-brewer friends and family to learn how to make beer at home. Hundreds of lively, educational events are held at homes, breweries, shops and clubs worldwide. Over 300 local celebrations and more than 4,000 participants are expected for this year’s celebration both in the U.S. and abroad.
“This year, we celebrate 40 years of the AHA, and 20 years of Learn to Homebrew Day. In 1999, Learn to Homebrew Day was established to promote the most rewarding and delicious activity of all time—homebrewing. And there’s never been a better time to give it a try,” said Gary Glass, director, American Homebrewers Association. “Each year, it’s gratifying to see so many beginners, hobbyists and professionals coming together. What’s also gratifying? Tasting your very own brew.”
(more…)

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Link: Brut IPA: The Best New Thing in Beer or Passing Fad?

via October:

“Clean, bright and modern.” That’s how Samantha Lee, co-founder of the Hopewell Brewing Company in Chicago, describes her brewery’s ethos, from the balance of its beers to the airy, inviting taproom. It’s also an apt description of Brut IPA, the latest phenomenon in American craft brewing’s seemingly never-ending love affair with the India Pale Ale.

Barely a year ago, Brut IPA began as a process innovation in a San Francisco brewpub. Kim Sturdavant of Social Kitchen and Brewery took a brewer’s enzyme called amyloglucosidase—an amylase enzyme typically used either for producing light beer or for lightening the body of big, viscous stouts—and added it to the recipe of a typical 7% ABV IPA. The process produced something new in itself: An IPA with zero residual sugar, restrained bitterness, lively carbonation and unparalleled drinkability. He called it the Champagne IPA, then later: Brut IPA.

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Hoppy Read: “The Complex Case of Thiols”

Editor Emeritus Stan Hieronymus has an article over at Beer&Brewing Magazine on Thiols – one of the compounds in hops that are responsible for those crazy hot tropical flavors.

Thiols, also known as mercaptans, are sulfur-containing organic compounds with a sulfur atom bound to a hydrogen atom. Thiols make up less than 1% of the essential oils in a hops cone but might hold a key to the fashionable in-demand tropical flavors.

Read at Beer&Brewing Magazine

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Charlie – and you know who we mean – is retiring

The godfather of American homebrewing has an exit strategy. The Brewers Association announced that Charlie Papazian will step down Jan. 23, 2019, on this 70th birthday.

Papazian and Charlie Matzen, both school teachers at the time, founded the American Homebrewers Association in Boulder, Colo., in 1978. Papazian started the Great American Beer Festival four years later. And the following year, the Association of Brewers was organized to include the AHA and the Institute for Brewing and Fermentation Studies to assist the growing number of new breweries. In 2005, the Association of Brewers and the Brewers’ Association of America merged to form the Brewers Association. Papazian served as its president until handing over the title to Bob Pease in 2016.

“We are all here today because of Charlie Papazian,” Pease said in a press release. “His influence on the homebrewing and craft brewing community is immeasurable. Who could have predicted that a simple wooden spoon, ingenuity and passion would spawn a community of more than one million homebrewers and 6,000 small and independent U.S. craft breweries.”

Many the brewers who joined what has become known as the craft beer movement learned to make beer in homebrew classes Papazian taught in Colorado in the 1970s. Still more learned from reading The Complete Joy of Homebrewing, following is advice to “Relax. Don’t worry. Have a homebrew.”

In the BA press release, Papazian says, “I had a playful vision that there would be a homebrewer in every neighborhood and a brewery in every town. But what I did not imagine, couldn’t imagine, never considered, was the impact that craft brewing would have on our culture, economy and American life.”

He will spend his final year at the BA completing many projects, including a craft brewing history archive project. The archive will house 40 years of craft beer history in the form of more than 100,000 publications, photographs, audiotapes, films, videos, and documents — including 140 video interviews of the pioneers of American craft brewing — and will be accessible to researchers via the BA. He will also deliver the keynote address at the AHA’s 40th annual National Homebrew Conference, Hombrew Con, in Portland, Ore., in June.

The BA inveites brewers and homebrewers are invited to share their well wishes and Charlie Papazian stories on the AHA and BA Facebook pages.

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The billion dollar impact of homebrewing

Research by the American Homebrewers Association suggests that the total impact of homebrewing on the American economy was $1.225 billion in 2015, and that homebrewing created 11,672 jobs.

An AHA survey found that 815 shops sold home beverage-making supplies to the nation’s estimated 1.2 million homebrewers in 2015, with collective revenues estimated at $764 million. However, Brewers Association economist Bart Watson explained that measures only part of the contribution to the economy.

“To estimate the total impact of that spending, we need to think about all the other ripples those dollars create,” he wrote at the AHA website. “Equipment suppliers buy raw materials to make the equipment. Homebrewing shops employ people, and those employees spend money. This is called the ‘multiplier effect.’ Retail multipliers are typically lower than those in manufacturing industries, but they can still add 20% to the total impact.

“To estimate the total impact, I put these spending numbers into economic impact modeling software called IMPLAN. For simplicity, I assigned the $764 million to a retail category that includes hobby shops. In addition, I put $50 million in building material and garden supply stores (I’m sure some of you have bought homebrew supplies at Home Depot) and another $50 million in food and beverage stores. The final $136 million I evenly divided between hotels, travel, restaurants, and entertainment (to estimate travel and other expenses).”

The AHA is a division of the Brewers Association.

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LongShot contest adds ‘East vs. West’ theme

Boston Beer Co. has added to new twist to its Samuel Adams LongShot contest from homebrewers. For the first time it will feature an “East vs. West” battle. Judges will choose one winning beer from east of the Mississipi River and one from the west. Each will be brewed by Samuel Adams and sold in the 2016 LongShot six-pack along with a beer from the winner of the Samuel Adams employee contest.

The submission window for the contest is May 1-16 and details are available at the company website. Winners will be announce at the 2015 Great American Beer Festival in Denver.

While Samuel Adams is accepting entries for the 2015 contest, the Samuel Adams LongShot American Homebrew Contest variety six-pack with winning brews from the 2014 winners will be available nationwide in select retail stores this spring. This year’s winners include Forestville, Calif., resident Greg Rasmussen; Smithtown, N.Y., resident Matthew Knott; and Brooklyn, N.Y., resident and Samuel Adams employee John Marra. The variety pack will include two bottles each of Greg’s “Raspy’s Robust Porter,” Matthew’s “Smokehouse Rauchbier” and John’s “Dark Night in Brooklyn” Dunkelweiss.