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OREGON – Zwickelmania celebrates 11th year

Zwickelmania celebrates 11th annual event, participating breweries to sell limited-release statewide collaboration beer
Event kicks off Feb. 16 in the Portland Metro area, and continues Feb. 23 across the rest of the state.

Over a decade ago, three-dozen Oregon breweries opened their doors on a Saturday in February for the first-ever Zwickelmania, a free statewide craft beer celebration that allowed visitors to tour Oregon breweries, meet the brewers and sample beers. About 4,000 craft beer fans took part in the inaugural event, which was designed as a way to promote Oregon’s craft beers and the brewers who make them.

Via: OregonCraftBeer.org

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What We’re Drinking: The Great Cheap Beer Debate – February 2019

Here at the Growler, we believe there’s a time and place for every drink. Wine, liquor, N/A options, hard seltzer—even macro beers. Sure, we don’t talk about it much, but sometimes life calls for a basic beer to wash down whatever B.S. happened that day. And what better time to pay homage to our go-to macros than in our Great Debates issue? We invite you to do the same and share your favorite big-name beer with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Let us know if you loathe this idea, too; it is meant to be a debate, after all.

Via growlermag.com

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Artists Using Beer to Create Fine Art

These artists are taking beer art to a whole new level. They are using the beer itself to paint with, the cans, tabs, bottle and caps — you name it — to make their creations ranging from realistic to abstract, each bringing their own flavor to the artistic process. And just like the craft beer industry, it’s not just local, its global. These artists are from a wide range of places and found common ground in this unexpected material inspiration.

Lucien Shapiro
Titled: Maculosos Scurra Larva | Artist Lucien Shapiro uses undocumented bottle caps gathered from various bars. (Lucien Shapiro)

Via craftbeer.com

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Malört – Forging Friendships With a Shot and a Beer

Chicagoans love it. Chicagoans also hate it. But, we love it even more because we hate it. So, if you find a bottle of Malört, take a taste. Think of it as the nation’s third largest city collectively pressuring you into enjoying it. And you will. You won’t know why you enjoy it, but you will.

Via www.porchdrinking.com

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Link: How Mobile Canning Brought us Closer to Beer

Good Beer Hunting writes on the mobile canning revolution that ushered in the new wave of small breweries canning there releases:

Ever since Oskar Blues’ Dale Katechis dropped his eponymous Pale Ale into aluminum back in 2002, the packaging format has slowly crept into territory owned by bottled 12-oz. six packs and 22-oz. bombers. Even the ubiquitous growler is making way for metal. The development of compact sealers introduced the market to “crowlers”—a technology developed by can manufacturing giant Ball and pioneered by Oskar Blues, who also acts as the machine’s distributor. Just like with regular-sized cans, the lightweight and recyclable nature of these 32-oz. containers is pushing the popularity of traditional glass flagons to the side.

But something that’s changed dramatically over the past decade or so is the consumer perception surrounding the quality of canned products. Even in the early 21st century, many beer drinkers—especially the early adopters of craft—considered cans to be inferior to bottles. These containers were the hallmark of mass-produced light Lagers, after all. (As it turns out, many craft diehards are coming around to that style as well.) Even folks like Katechis were worried—he admitted in a 2012 interview with CNBC that cans would be perceived as a “gimmick.” Those fears, with time, were ultimately unfounded.

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BrewDog’s New London Pub Features Beer Price Tied to London Financial Index

The idea is interesting — especially considering the pub is in the heart of the London financial district. Fluctuating prices of a beer based on the FTSE financial index. The price of the beer called Hop Exchange goes up as the FTSE 100 goes up. When it has a bad day, the price comes down.

Link: American Craft Beer

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Humor: Sure Our Beer Is Impossible To Track Down…

Ever thought that the lines for beer releases are out of hand? Dave Powers takes a humorous look at the phenomenon in McSweeney’s.

Ever since our flagship septuple IPA landed in the number one position on a popular beer rating website, due in part to positive word of mouth (as well as a flaw we discovered in the site’s database that allowed us to leave an unlimited number of five-star reviews), demand for our product has skyrocketed. This, combined with our refusal to distribute anywhere outside the confines of our own facility in order to strategically and artificially limit the available supply, has resulted in people clamoring for our beer. If you’re looking to pick some up for yourself, just know that your chances of success are about the same as the ABV of your average domestic light beer.

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R.I.P. All About Beer Magazine (1979-2018)

Jeff Alworth brings us the sad news that All About Beer has apparently ceased publishing.

But losing All About Beer hurts. As an institution spanning the entirety of the American craft beer era, it functioned as a reflection of the American beer industry. the late Michael Jackson and Fred Eckhardt, writers who helped launch beer journalism, were stalwarts in its pages. All About Beer covered every business story, new style development, personality clash, and all the trends and development in craft beer since its beginning. From mustaches to goatees to lumberjack beards—as well as the increasingly common faces of women who subvert the facial-hair stereotype—AAB captured brewers in all their phases.

It’s truly a sad way for the magazine to end. Folks like Julie Johnson and Daniel Bradford have put decades into the business, and writers and editors sweated out tough stories and late nights making deadlines. Jon Page, the managing editor during its late, greatest phase, added this. “During my time at the magazine, it wasn’t uncommon to meet brewers who were inspired to start their breweries after reading All About Beer Magazine, or to meet readers who had collected years worth of issues. Going back nearly four decades, the magazine’s archives are truly a treasure trove of brewing history and culture.”

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