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Jameson Irish Whiskey partners with Tattoo Artists for unique, never to be forgotten, release swag

TORONTO – To celebrate the launch of Jameson Caskmates IPA Edition, Jameson Irish Whiskey is hosting the Hopped Garden at Stackt, Toronto . It will run from Aug 1-4 and Aug 8-11 partnering with Inkbox and Mr. Koo of Ink and Water to offer free one of a kind tattoos on each Saturday.
Via – Yahoo Finance

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Congratulations to the latest Falconer Foundation Scholarship winners!

Catherine Wiest and Jaron Shepherd were selected from an outstanding group of talented applicants to receive the 2019 Glen Hay Falconer Foundation Siebel Brewing Scholarships. Catherine Wiest is from Pelican Brewing Company (Pacific City, OR) and Jaron Shepherd is from 21st Amendment Brewery (San Leandro, CA).
The Glen Hay Falconer Foundation scholarship program encompasses over half of the United States geography and the scholarships draw candidates from throughout that region.
Via Falconer Foundation Press Release

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Apply for 2 Siebel Scholarships from Falconer Foundation

In collaboration with the Siebel Institute of Technology, the Glen Hay Falconer Foundation is offering two full-tuition brewing education scholarships in 2019. Both scholarship are full tuition grants and come with generous travel/lodging stipends.

The first scholarship is to the World Brewing Academy Concise Course in Brewing Technology in Chicago in November 2019. The Concise Course in Brewing Technology is a two-week intensive program that covers every topic critical to successful brewery operations. The program is designed for brewers pursuing a wider knowledge of professional brewing standards and techniques in order to advance their brewing careers as well as individuals planning to enter the brewing industry. The Concise Course scholarship includes a $1,000 stipend to help offset travel and lodging expenses.
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OREGON – Zwickelmania celebrates 11th year

Zwickelmania celebrates 11th annual event, participating breweries to sell limited-release statewide collaboration beer
Event kicks off Feb. 16 in the Portland Metro area, and continues Feb. 23 across the rest of the state.

Over a decade ago, three-dozen Oregon breweries opened their doors on a Saturday in February for the first-ever Zwickelmania, a free statewide craft beer celebration that allowed visitors to tour Oregon breweries, meet the brewers and sample beers. About 4,000 craft beer fans took part in the inaugural event, which was designed as a way to promote Oregon’s craft beers and the brewers who make them.

Via: OregonCraftBeer.org

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State of Beer Communication Call for Survey Takers

Zephyr Conferences is once again conducting an exhaustive survey of the state of beer communications. It’s been two years since our last survey of this type. With our recent re-branding to Beer Now (formerly Beer Bloggers and Writers Conference) we have already identified the need to provide information and value to all the types of beer communicators working to promote beer advocacy.

This means this survey is open to all types of beer communicators: beer bloggers, beer writers (professional and freelance), beer publication editors, beer podcast producers and hosts, Instagram Influencers, corporate beer bloggers/marketers, beer “vloggers,” and anyone else actively promoting beer.

Please help us by setting aside 7-10 minutes to take this anonymous survey. Anyone who provides contact information will be sent a recap of our results.

SURVEY CLOSES FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1, 2019

Via: beernow.org

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Yuengling Marks 190th Anniversary With Year-Long Celebration

D.G. Yuengling & Son, Inc., America’s Oldest Brewery®, is celebrating 190 years and six generations of family brewing. In 2019, Yuengling will commemorate its 190th anniversary by offering fans exciting packaging, promotions, special beers, and celebratory events throughout the year.

Since it was founded in 1829, America’s Oldest Brewery has remained fiercely independent, family-owned and continuously operated by the Yuengling family for six generations. Yuengling can now be enjoyed in 22 states with core beer brands: Yuengling® Traditional Lager, Light Lager, Black & Tan, and Golden Pilsner – the first new core product in 17 years and introduced in 2018 by the 6th generation – Jen, Wendy, Debbie and Sheryl Yuengling.

Via: Yuengling

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Falconer Foundation announces ABG Scholarship winner

Press Release:
BARRY CHAN SECURES DISTINGUISHED AMERICAN BREWERS GUILD SCHOLARSHIP
From an outstanding group of talented applicants, Barry Chan of Lucky Envelope Brewing (Seattle, WA) has been named recipient of the 2019 American Brewers Guild scholarship. Barry will be attending ABG’s Intensive Brewing Science & Engineering course that runs from January to June 2019. The Intensive Brewing Science & Engineering course is a 22-week distance education program with a final week of residential instruction in Middlebury, VT. The course covers all the fundamentals of beer production and quality assurance with a special emphasis on practical issues.
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Press release: Jester King sues Texas commission

The press release:

Jester King Craft brewery, maker of artisan farmhouse ales in the beautiful Texas Hill Country on the outskirts of Austin, has filed suit against the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC). On Wednesday, attorneys representing Jester King Craft Brewery and two other co-plaintiffs filed a motion for summary judgment in federal court asking that the case be decided in our favor.

We have sued the TABC because we believe that its Code violates our rights under the 1st and 14th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States. Under the Code, we are not allowed to tell the beer drinking public where our beer is sold. We are also not permitted to use accurate terms to describe our beers. We are often forced to choose either to label them inaccurately or not to make beers that we would like to brew. Under the bizarre, antiquated naming system mandated by the TABC Code, we have to call everything we brew over 4% alcohol by weight (ABW) “Ale” or “Malt Liquor” and everything we brew at or below 4% ABW “beer”. This results in nonsensical and somewhat comical situations where we have to call pale ale at or below 4% ABW “pale beer” and lager that is over 4% ABW “ale”. The State has arrogantly and autocratically cast aside centuries of rich brewing tradition by taking it upon itself to redefine terms that reference flavor and production method as a simple shorthand for alcoholic strength.

At the same time, the State prohibits breweries from using other terms that accurately reference alcoholic strength like “strong” or “low alcohol”. That means you will not be seeing any Belgian or American Strong Ale in Texas. Further, the State restricts the contexts in which we can communicate the actual alcohol content of our beers. We are not allowed to put the alcoholic content on anything the State considers advertising, which includes our website and social media. We are simply seeking to exercise free and truthful speech about the beer we make and strongly believe that the State has no interest in keeping you from knowing the type of beer we make, how strong it is, or where it’s sold.

Our claim under the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment, maintains that breweries, like wineries, should be able to sell their products directly to the public. Right now in Texas, we cannot sell our beer at our brewery. We can only sell beer through a retailer or distributor. When people visit Jester King and ask to buy our beer, we have to tell them, “Sorry, it’s illegal.” Brewpubs are faced with an equal and opposite restriction. They can sell beer on-site, but cannot sell beer through a retailer or distributor. Texas wineries on the other hand are allowed to sell on-site and through retailers and distributors. We are suing because the State has no rational interest in maintaining special restrictions aimed at limiting the sale of beer.

Finally, the lawsuit challenges the State’s requirement that every foreign brewery wishing to sell beer in Texas obtain its own separate license. Foreign wineries and distilleries are not burdened by this requirement. They may simply sell their products in Texas through an importer that has one license for all the wine and spirits it brings into our state. The result is that small, artisan beer makers often have their beer kept out of Texas by unduly burdensome fees.

When we started Jester King, part of our plan was to help other small, artisan brewers, from both the United States and abroad, sell their products in Texas. This is something that we remain interested in doing at some point, which is where our material interest in this part of the case comes into play. Our much larger interest, however, is in allowing Texas beer drinkers to have access to the beers that helped shape our desire to build an authentic farmhouse brewery in the Texas Hill Country and that have had a direct influence on the type of beers that we have set out to brew. Many of these beers are from small overseas breweries whose products are currently being sold elsewhere in the U.S., but not in Texas because of exorbitant licensing fees. We would like to have the ability to purchase these beers in our local market and would like for all Texas beer drinkers to be able to do the same.

We have chosen to pursue these matters in federal court after witnessing the lack of progress that has resulted from previous attempts to address the inequities of the TABC Code legislatively. During the last legislative session, there were bills aimed at giving breweries and brewpubs similar rights to Texas wineries, but these bills never even made it out of committee.

We cannot say how likely we are to succeed in this lawsuit. The State has only to show a rational basis for restricting our freedom and the freedom of beer drinkers in this matter. However, as long as there is a TABC Code in Texas that discriminates against and puts undue burdens on breweries both home and abroad, we will continue to do everything in our power to fight for a more just and free system for us and for beer drinkers in our state.

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Press release: Pike Brewing completes expansion

Pike Brewing has recently added new stainless steel bright beer tanks, cylinder-conical fermenters, conditioning tanks, a state of the art glycol chiller and a high pressure steam keg filler, and a new gearbox and motor on our mash tun, all allowing us to increase production by approximately 30%.

Pike Head Brewer, Dean Mochizuki, reports that, “Our tanks arenew fermenters now full and we have, for the first time in the last few years, sufficient stock to supply orders.” Pike Sales Manager, Steve Case, had advised distributors to sell Pike beers primarily to existing accounts until the increased capacity was realized. He is now advising, “Full steam ahead!” Steve, a seasoned professional, joined the brewery in early 2011 and reports that the Pike brand is “on fire!” Dean, who has been with the brewery nine years, was promoted to head brewer in April 2011 and has witnessed a lot of changes at the brewery since the Finkel family re-acquired it five years ago.

Pike is a gravity flow, steam brewery in the heart of Seattle’s Pike Place Market historical district. Pike was the brainchild of Charles Finkel, the founder of “Merchant du Vin.” Charles was the first to introduce a wide selection of brewing styles to the United States market; at the time, though it was the largest beer market in the world, there were only a few styles available. The Pike Brewery brews top fermented beers including Pike Pale, IPA, Double IPA, Naughty Nellie Golden, Dry Wit, Tandem Double, Monk’s Uncle Tripel, Old Bawdy Barley Wine, XXXXX Extra Stout, Auld Acquaintance, and others. Pike beers are distributed throughout the Pacific Northwest, and at select retailers around the country.

Because of Pike’s urban location, room to expand capacity is limited to the existing space. The original brewery on Western Avenue dates back to 1989 and is one-half block below the current brewery. When it opened, it was what would now be known as a ‘nano brewery,’ producing around 500 barrels of Pike’s top fermented ale per year. The company moved to its current location and added The Pike Pub in 1996; by the time Rose Ann and Charles Finkel sold Pike at the end of 1997, the brewery had experienced a ten-fold increase in production to around 5,000 barrels. In the ensuing years sales volume remained around the same level.

According to Charles Finkel, “people presumed that the brewery was maxed out on production and that there was no room to expand. We originally designed the brewery to produce around 18,000 barrels of beer.” The expansion team was headed up by Pike Vice President and General Manager, Drew Gillespie. Drew reports, “We chose Newlands Systems of British Columbia to produce stainless steel tanks that are as beautiful as they are functional. Given the space restrictions, we had to trust that Newland’s could produce tanks to our minute specifications. Once delivered, Ballard Transfer of Seattle completed the installation. With less than an inch clearance in some areas, there were more than a few nervous moments; the tanks were raised into place and the team breathed a collective sigh of relief. The expanded glycol system was manufactured by Pro Refrigeration of Auburn WA and installed by Universal Refrigeration. KHS, a German firm, supplied the state of the art keg filler and conveyor system increasing our capacity to 30 kegs per hour. Seattle’s McKinstry Co, who originally built the brewery, replaced the aging mash tun gearbox and motor. When all the work was complete, the outside of Pike’s building got a beautiful new paint job befitting a world class brewery. Even with the expansion, Pike remains a small craft brewery. According to Charles and Rose Ann Finkel, “our sales growth is reliant on word of mouth, much of it from the thousands of people who visit the Pike Pub and tour the brewery annually. Our goal is not to be the biggest brewery, but rather, to be among the best breweries anywhere.”