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A Pilgrimage To Meet Germany’s Last Beer-Brewing Nun


It seems that every town in the southern German state of Bavaria — no matter how small — has a brewery, and beer is brewed by all sorts of people. And before you judge farmer Zausinger for his morning beer run, consider who he bought it from: Sister Doris Engelhard, a 72-year-old Franciscan nun. She claims to be the world’s last nun brewmeister, and woe unto anyone who would argue that title. Read or listen to more at NPR

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Iconic Falling Rock in Denver to Close

An end to an era.
Raise your hand if you have been to the Falling Rock tap house in Denver.
Raise both hands if you have been to the Falling Rock and met up with old friends, met new friends, enjoyed an awesome beer you’ve never had before, sat outside on a warm evening under the stars, stood outside on a bitterly cold evening watching the snow fall, enjoyed some great live music, enjoyed some lousy live music, been downstairs in the crowded basement for a special event, watch Chris Black stand on a table to make an announcement……
On Saturday, proprietor Chris Black announced that the Falling Rock was closing after 24 years.
Read More Via ProBrewer.com

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Manhattan’s Forgotten Brewpubs

A Short History of Manhattan’s Forgotten First Wave of Brewpubs
“I’ve lived in lower Manhattan my entire adult life,” says Torch & Crown co-founder John Dantzler. “But there wasn’t anyone making the beer here that I wanted to drink. It’s a major discrepancy that we’re in the most densely populated part of the country and there isn’t a brewery built to serve the community.” That wasn’t always the case, however, by any stretch of the imagination. In fact, Manhattan used to be a hotbed for brewing operations. Especially in the ‘80s and ‘90s.
What happened?
Read More Via VinePair

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Beer History! The “Drink Schlitz or I’ll Kill You” campaign that killed the brand

Milwaukee-based Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company was America’s top brewer through the first half of the 20th century. Their flagship beer, Schlitz, “the beer that made Milwaukee famous,” an iconic American-style lager.
Then, through a series of bad business decisions, including a disastrous ad campaign, dubbed the “Drink Schlitz or I’ll kill you” campaign, led to the downfall of America’s biggest beer brand. It’s known as the “Schlitz mistake.”
Via Vinepair

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The History of Presidents and Beer

The Secret History of Presidents and Beer
Americans love leaders who look like someone they’d get a beer with — no matter how ambiguous that description is.
When Anthony Bourdain sat down with President Barack Obama for dinner and a beer in 2016, the President shared he rarely slips out of the White House for a beer he had something better…White House homebrew.
Via Vinepair

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A History of the Ancient Peruvian Corn Beer Chicha, (Not) Made With Human Saliva

An Alternative History of Chicha, the Ancient Peruvian Corn Beer (Not) Made With Human Saliva
Chicha de jora, or “chicha”, is a corn-based brew originating in southern Peru. Ancient in origin, found on street corners and in municipal markets in the Andean regions of Peru and Bolivia. There vendors pour it in repurposed plastic soda bottles to go, or ladle it into pint glasses for passersby to guzzle on the sidewalk.
Via VINEPAIR

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San Diego’s checkered beer history


A long, unsteady pour: San Diego’s checkered beer history
In San Diego beer, some of yesterday’s booming successes are today’s forgotten footnotes. The Union-Tribune’s research manager, Merrie Monteagudo recently forwarded two 1874 photos of downtown San Diego. Our beer history has been a long, unsteady pour.
Via San Diego Union Tribune

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The History of Beer Is the History of the World

Homer Simpson sez “beer is the cause of, and the solution to, all of life’s problems”. Some scientists claim beer may be the origin of civilization as we know it. The first civilizations emerged along the great river valleys of the then known world: the Tigris and Euphrates, the Ganges and Indus, the Yangtze and Yellow.
Via Outside Magazine

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UK – 1,100-Year-Old Viking ‘Beer Hall’ Discovered.

1,100-Year-Old Viking ‘Beer Hall’ Discovered. But It Was Only for the Elites.

Discovered on the island of Rousay, Orkney, in northern Scotland, archaeologists recently unearthed Viking drinking hall. The hall appeared to have been open from the 10th to the 12th centuries, likely served upper class Vikings, according to archaeologists.
Now, all that remains are stones, a handful of artifacts, and very old trash heaps.
Via Live Science

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