Why Are New England IPAs So Expensive?

This particular combination of hops, malt, and yeast, coupled with their short shelf life, make NEIPAs one of the more expensive beers to produce. How, then, are national breweries like New Belgium able to sell their NEIPAs for merely $11.99, a figure comparable to 6-packs of Corona?

We crunched the numbers with five brewers. The results are pretty, well, crushing.

Via vinepair.com

Miller High Life taking Champagne bottles nationwide for the holidays

Instead of popping the cork this holiday season, the Champagne of Beers wants drinkers to pry off the top of its new limited-release Champagne-sized bottles. Miller High Life this week launched nationwide for the first time its custom 750-milliliter bottles for the final two months of 2018.

Via www.millercoorsblog.com

Malört – Forging Friendships With a Shot and a Beer

Chicagoans love it. Chicagoans also hate it. But, we love it even more because we hate it. So, if you find a bottle of Malört, take a taste. Think of it as the nation’s third largest city collectively pressuring you into enjoying it. And you will. You won’t know why you enjoy it, but you will.

Via www.porchdrinking.com

New AB InBev Video Claims Craft Beer Will Be Gone In Two Years

Yet, despite owning a number of smaller breweries, and leading sales of packaged craft-style beer, AB InBev still doesn’t appear to be completely at ease with the term craft.

The brewing giant recently launched a three-part Instagram TV series called “Brewers on Tap, a show which includes interviews with the founders of some ABI-owned craft breweries. During the first episode, host Christina Perozzi asks: “What do you think craft beer is now? Do we even want to use the word?

Jaron Mitchell of 4 Pines Brewing Co. answered, “I think the term will be gone in a couple of years time”. Probably long before our time there was another term. Probably used to be called lizard beer.

Via: VinePair.

Artisanal Brewing Ventures Acquires Sixpoint Brewery

Artisanal Brewing Ventures, the family office-backed holding company formed in early 2016 via the merger of Victory Brewing and Southern Tier Brewing, today announced the acquisition of New York-based Sixpoint Brewery.

“Adding Sixpoint to the ABV family is consistent with our strategy of working with successful regional brands that have great local market penetration, passionate fans, and opportunity to grow,” John Coleman, the CEO of Artisanal Brewing Ventures, said via the release. “Our resources, expertise in craft beer and high operating standards can unlock Sixpoint’s growth potential, improve its productivity, and allow their team to focus on what makes Sixpoint special and successful: brewing great beer, creating strong local relevance and building an authentic brand.”

Via: BrewBound

Number of Active U.S. Breweries Surges Past 7,000, For New All-Time High

Craft beer is growing by leaps and bounds. As reported by CraftBeer.com, the number of active breweries in the U.S. surged past 7,000 last month —boosted by small and independent openings— setting a new, all-time high.

The stat, provided by the Brewers Association’s Chief Economist Bart Watson, reveals that as of the end of October, there were 7,082 active breweries in the U.S. That’s an increase of more than 1,100 compared to the same time last year.

Via: VinePair

ABInbev Cancels Plans for a Golden Road Beer Garden in Fiercely Independent Oakland, CA

A planned Oakland brewery and beer garden from Los Angeles-based Golden Road has hit a dead end. Berkeleyside confirms that the brewery, owned since 2015 by beverage industry Goliath Anheuser-Busch InBev, won’t pursue its proposal for an empty Temescal parking lot (at 320, 322, and 330 40th Street) after all. Instead, the company is shifting its focus to other projects, a representative tells Berkeleyside.

via Eater SF

Link: How Mobile Canning Brought us Closer to Beer

Good Beer Hunting writes on the mobile canning revolution that ushered in the new wave of small breweries canning there releases:

Ever since Oskar Blues’ Dale Katechis dropped his eponymous Pale Ale into aluminum back in 2002, the packaging format has slowly crept into territory owned by bottled 12-oz. six packs and 22-oz. bombers. Even the ubiquitous growler is making way for metal. The development of compact sealers introduced the market to “crowlers”—a technology developed by can manufacturing giant Ball and pioneered by Oskar Blues, who also acts as the machine’s distributor. Just like with regular-sized cans, the lightweight and recyclable nature of these 32-oz. containers is pushing the popularity of traditional glass flagons to the side.

But something that’s changed dramatically over the past decade or so is the consumer perception surrounding the quality of canned products. Even in the early 21st century, many beer drinkers—especially the early adopters of craft—considered cans to be inferior to bottles. These containers were the hallmark of mass-produced light Lagers, after all. (As it turns out, many craft diehards are coming around to that style as well.) Even folks like Katechis were worried—he admitted in a 2012 interview with CNBC that cans would be perceived as a “gimmick.” Those fears, with time, were ultimately unfounded.

It’s that time of year again! No, not Halloween, “Learn to Homebrew Day!”

Press release from AHA:

November 3rd is the 20th Annual ‘Learn to Homebrew Day’

Beginner, Hobbyist and Professional Brewers from All Over the World to Participate

Boulder, Colo • October 23, 2018—On November 3, the American Homebrewers Association®(AHA)—which this year is celebrating its 40th anniversary—hosts the 20th annual Learn to Homebrew Day, an opportunity for homebrewers to draft their non-brewer friends and family to learn how to make beer at home. Hundreds of lively, educational events are held at homes, breweries, shops and clubs worldwide. Over 300 local celebrations and more than 4,000 participants are expected for this year’s celebration both in the U.S. and abroad.
“This year, we celebrate 40 years of the AHA, and 20 years of Learn to Homebrew Day. In 1999, Learn to Homebrew Day was established to promote the most rewarding and delicious activity of all time—homebrewing. And there’s never been a better time to give it a try,” said Gary Glass, director, American Homebrewers Association. “Each year, it’s gratifying to see so many beginners, hobbyists and professionals coming together. What’s also gratifying? Tasting your very own brew.”
(more…)

BrewDog’s New London Pub Features Beer Price Tied to London Financial Index

The idea is interesting — especially considering the pub is in the heart of the London financial district. Fluctuating prices of a beer based on the FTSE financial index. The price of the beer called Hop Exchange goes up as the FTSE 100 goes up. When it has a bad day, the price comes down.

Link: American Craft Beer