Why Companies That Have No Business Making Beer Are Suddenly Selling Their Own Brews

The wave started with Blockbuster, back in September. The almost-defunct video store’s swan song had nothing to do with movies, but rather beer: The last standing location collaborated with its Bend, OR, neighbor 10 Barrel Brewing on a black ale appropriately named The Last Blockbuster. Less than two weeks later, Dunkin’ Donuts released a coffee porter with fellow Massachusetts favorite, Harpoon Brewery. It was IHOP’s turn next: The chain followed up the great IHOb debacle with IHOPS, a pumpkin pancake stout made with Keegan Ales. Then, in late October, Planters and Noon Whistle Brewing unveiled their IPA-Nut IPA. Four beers, in two short months, from four companies that all have one thing in common: They do not make beer. So, why the sudden rush to release these craft brew collaborations?

Via Delish

Detroit Breweries Collaborate to Create Faygo Inspired Beers

For the past four years, Detroit area breweries have teamed up in October to collaborate on innovative beers in honor of the Michigan Brewers Guild’s Fall Beer Festival. However, this year’s theme took experimentation to the next level. Seven breweries decided to pay homage to the cornerstone of Michigan pop (not soda), Faygo, the beloved pop brand of Michiganders and Juggalos alike.

Via www.porchdrinking.com

More than 1,200 breweries to make Resilience IPA with Sierra Nevada

…To date, more than 1,200 breweries are participating, including craft brewers all over Northern California, major national producers like Founders, Stone, Dogfish Head, Firestone-Walker and New Belgium. Internationally, brewers like BrewDog and Garage Project are also getting in on helping out.

Via www.sfgate.com

Artists Using Beer to Create Fine Art

These artists are taking beer art to a whole new level. They are using the beer itself to paint with, the cans, tabs, bottle and caps — you name it — to make their creations ranging from realistic to abstract, each bringing their own flavor to the artistic process. And just like the craft beer industry, it’s not just local, its global. These artists are from a wide range of places and found common ground in this unexpected material inspiration.

Lucien Shapiro
Titled: Maculosos Scurra Larva | Artist Lucien Shapiro uses undocumented bottle caps gathered from various bars. (Lucien Shapiro)

Via craftbeer.com

Brut IPA: How Ancient Techniques Are Driving the World’s Trendiest Beers

Unless you’ve been living under a beer-repellant rock, you’ve likely heard the word “brut” thrown around the beer world lately. This is mostly due to the recently emerged, rapidly spreading brut IPA category.

But “brut” is not new to brews. Brewers have been experimenting with the sparkling-wine-inspired method for at least a decade. Called bière brut, or bière de Champagne, bottle-conditioned, effervescent beers are are produced in, or inspired by, the méthode Champenoise (Champagne method). The ancient technique is also known as the méthode traditionelle or méthode originale.

via Vinepair

Why Are New England IPAs So Expensive?

This particular combination of hops, malt, and yeast, coupled with their short shelf life, make NEIPAs one of the more expensive beers to produce. How, then, are national breweries like New Belgium able to sell their NEIPAs for merely $11.99, a figure comparable to 6-packs of Corona?

We crunched the numbers with five brewers. The results are pretty, well, crushing.

Via vinepair.com

Miller High Life taking Champagne bottles nationwide for the holidays

Instead of popping the cork this holiday season, the Champagne of Beers wants drinkers to pry off the top of its new limited-release Champagne-sized bottles. Miller High Life this week launched nationwide for the first time its custom 750-milliliter bottles for the final two months of 2018.

Via www.millercoorsblog.com

Malört – Forging Friendships With a Shot and a Beer

Chicagoans love it. Chicagoans also hate it. But, we love it even more because we hate it. So, if you find a bottle of Malört, take a taste. Think of it as the nation’s third largest city collectively pressuring you into enjoying it. And you will. You won’t know why you enjoy it, but you will.

Via www.porchdrinking.com

New AB InBev Video Claims Craft Beer Will Be Gone In Two Years

Yet, despite owning a number of smaller breweries, and leading sales of packaged craft-style beer, AB InBev still doesn’t appear to be completely at ease with the term craft.

The brewing giant recently launched a three-part Instagram TV series called “Brewers on Tap, a show which includes interviews with the founders of some ABI-owned craft breweries. During the first episode, host Christina Perozzi asks: “What do you think craft beer is now? Do we even want to use the word?

Jaron Mitchell of 4 Pines Brewing Co. answered, “I think the term will be gone in a couple of years time”. Probably long before our time there was another term. Probably used to be called lizard beer.

Via: VinePair.

Artisanal Brewing Ventures Acquires Sixpoint Brewery

Artisanal Brewing Ventures, the family office-backed holding company formed in early 2016 via the merger of Victory Brewing and Southern Tier Brewing, today announced the acquisition of New York-based Sixpoint Brewery.

“Adding Sixpoint to the ABV family is consistent with our strategy of working with successful regional brands that have great local market penetration, passionate fans, and opportunity to grow,” John Coleman, the CEO of Artisanal Brewing Ventures, said via the release. “Our resources, expertise in craft beer and high operating standards can unlock Sixpoint’s growth potential, improve its productivity, and allow their team to focus on what makes Sixpoint special and successful: brewing great beer, creating strong local relevance and building an authentic brand.”

Via: BrewBound

Number of Active U.S. Breweries Surges Past 7,000, For New All-Time High

Craft beer is growing by leaps and bounds. As reported by CraftBeer.com, the number of active breweries in the U.S. surged past 7,000 last month —boosted by small and independent openings— setting a new, all-time high.

The stat, provided by the Brewers Association’s Chief Economist Bart Watson, reveals that as of the end of October, there were 7,082 active breweries in the U.S. That’s an increase of more than 1,100 compared to the same time last year.

Via: VinePair