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Corona for St. Patty’s Day – What!?

Does this strike you as a little strange?

Iconic Mexican beer Corona, famous for being served with a wedge of lime jammed in the top, will launch a 15-second TV spot and a 60-second radio ad in March to boost sales of the brew in the run-up to St. Patrick’s Day, the beverage importer Gambrinus said.

The images on TV and in retail outlets show a wedge of lime carved into the shape of a shamrock. The TV spot will air nationally, and the radio ad in 40 markets.

[Via Brandweek]

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What your drink says about you

Waiter Rant “reveals” what your drink says about you and takes no prisoners.

Of course we have to point to the beer entry: “Blue collar, simple, and an old standby. (I think a girl wearing a t-shirt and jeans while drinking a good ‘ol Bud is very sexy.)”

A few more:

Chardonnay – You know what you like. Boring. Predictable. The Missionary Position of White Wine.

Sour Apple Martini – You have a sense of fun but overindulgence might cause dancing on tables and bad karaoke singing. (Beth?)

Campari and Soda – You’re a gourmand. A good aperitif. A bitter drink for bitter people.

Champagne
– You’re reserved, classy, or a stripper.

And then there is one of the comments: “Not subidviding “Beer” is somewhat like not distinguishing between wines. Someone drinking Budlight isn’t THAT similar to someone drinking microbrews.”

Amen.

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St. Pauli Girl 2006

St. Pauli GirlWe learned long ago that the best time to buy beer at our local Oktoberfest is when the St. Pauli Girl shows up to sign posters – because that’s where the line will be.

So as a public service announcement we offer this: To mark the annual selection of a new St. Pauli Girl the brewing company will give away 400 free posters each day on the brand’s website. Additionally, from March through May, another 40 free posters will be given away each day to consumers on a first-come, first-served basis. And, a downloadable version will be available on the St. Pauli Girl Beer website as a screensaver.

By the way, Brittany Evans is model chosen to adorn the 2006 poster and represent the brand throught the year.

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Blind Tasting Test

Oregon Craft Beer Week gets more packed with events every year.

News comes from Portland that the Oregon Brewers Festival has added a fundraiser the evening before the festival officially starts. The inaugural OBFl Blind Tasting & Test, a benefit for the Oregon Blind Commission, will take place from 5-9 p.m. July 26 on the festival grounds at Tom McCall Waterfront Park.

The Blind Tasting & Test begins with the tasting portion, in which a total of 24 different beers will be served: 12 IPAs brewed in Oregon, and 12 Pale Ales brewed in Oregon. Beers will be served on a tasting tray in two-ounce samples. Patrons will be encouraged to vote for the “People’s Choice,” one vote for each of the two styles. Following the tabulation, the winning brewery from each beer category will be announced, with the two winners receiving a trip to a European beer festival for the brewer and a guest.

For the Blind Test, patrons will be asked to identify each of the 24 beers served. Votes will be tabulated, and a winner from each category will be selected. The two winners of the identification test will also receive a trip each to a European beer festival for themselves and a guest.

At the conclusion of the blind test, all 24 of the beer taps will be opened and the attendees will be invited to sample beer in their souvenir mugs until the taps close at 9 p.m.

The festival itself runs July 27-29.

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Beer not included

Once again, Saint Arnold Brewing Co. in Houston is actioning off the rights to name a fermenter. Racing to keep up with rapid growth, Saint Arnold has installed its first 120 barrel fermenter and as it did in 2004 the brewery us auctioning the naming rights on eBay.

This is actually the third time Saint Arnold has offered customers the opportunity to become a part of the brewery. Previously:

– In 2004, the brewery held a similar auction for one of its tanks, which led to the christening of the “St. Gonzo” tank.

– In 2003, the brewery’s supporters gladly handed over close to $7,500 to help the brewery pay for a reverse osmosis system to purify its water. Those who donated to the cause have their names displayed on the water tank.

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Beer for the turkey

The Publican in Britain asked a variety of beer types what beer they’d serve with a Christmas turkey. We particularly like the reply from Ben McFarland (beer writer of the year):

At Christmas, you need a beer that copes with every potentially disastrous gastronomic eventuality. If the turkey ends up drier than a pensioner’s elbow, if the sprouts resemble charcoal and if you set fire to the pub using too much cheap brandy on the Christmas pudding, then a refreshing, thirst-quenching lager is the first thing your parched palate will be wanting in its Christmas stocking.

I suggest a dainty lager called Lapin Kulta. Brewed by female brewers in the upper reaches of Lapland, Lapin Kulta is Santa’s local beer and is perfect for drinking after a hard day harrying elves, gift-wrapping and putting up with spoilt little eight-year-olds. It’s also a festive alternative to the chewy charms of the full-bodied Christmas ales so often sipped at this time of the year.

What beer do you suppose he’d suggest drinking along with the movie Bad Santa?

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Malt liquor on the wine menu

Each Friday the Wall Street Journal helps its readers prepare for the weekend with a bit of advice about liquid refreshments.

Dorothy Gaiter and John Brecher are among the nation’s finest wine writers, and this week they look into Sauternes class of 2001, which is just being released. Sauternes, from the Bordeaux region of France, is the world’s greatest sweet wine, with good bottles starting at $40 at retail and prices rocketing higher. That’s a 750ml bottle, about 25 ounces.

This Friday the WSJ offers an alternative: malt liquors, served in 40-ounce bottles. The headline calls this Malt Liquor’s Moment and the story reports:

But in a few places across the country, malt liquor is having something of a cultural moment. It’s showing up on the menu of popular restaurants like Emmy’s Spaghetti Shack in San Francisco, where Mickey’s is served in an ice-filled champagne bucket. Some microbrewers, who pride themselves on their “craft beer” made with fancy ingredients, have launched their own lines of malt liquor: Pizza Port in Solana Beach, Calif., periodically makes its Brown Bag Malt Liquor, and Piece, a restaurant and brewery in Chicago, offers Dolemite, named after a 1975 blaxploitation film. There’s even a cadre of collectors who pay as much as $300 on eBay for rare specimens of the 40-ounce bottles — even empty.

There’s even a picture of Dogfish Head Brewery’s Liquor de Malt, including the paper bag it comes in.

Tomme Arthur, who brews the Pizza Port Brown Bag Malt Liquor, previously has pointed out that he asks to judge this category at the World Beer Cup and Great American Beer Festival each year.

“Some like to shun their past. Me, I embrace it,” he said.

[Note: The WSJ is a subscription site.]

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Saga of the 10-ounce can

Newcomers to St. Mary’s County (Maryland) may not understand why beer is available in 10-ounce cans and why they are so popular. It costs the same, if not more, than a 12-ounce can. So why would people buy it?

‘‘It’s just become a big item in the county,” distributor George Guy said. ‘‘People feel it’s something they created. It’s something that belongs to them.”

[From Gazette.net]

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Beer, saloons and booze on TV

The History Channel has them all today. And coffee, too. Their description of the beer segment:

It’s one of the world’s oldest and most beloved beverages–revered by Pharaohs and brewed by America’s Founding Fathers. Today, brewing the bitter elixir is a multi-billion-dollar global industry. Join us for an invigorating look at brewing’s history from prehistoric times to today’s cutting-edge craft breweries, focusing on its gradually evolving technologies and breakthroughs. We’ll find the earliest known traces of brewing, which sprang up independently in such far-flung places as ancient Sumeria, China, and Finland; examine the surprising importance that beer held in the daily and ceremonial life of ancient Egypt; and at Delaware’s Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, an adventurous anthropologist and a cutting-edge brewer show us the beer they’ve concocted based on 2,700-year-old DNA found in drinking vessels from the funerary of the legendary King Midas.

At 10 Eastern and repeated during the wee hours.