Realbeer.com
 

Aug 20, 2014

Library
RBPMail 6.08, August 2000

Real Beer Page Mail (RBPMail) began as a modest update to craft-brew events on the WWW. It evolved into a news digest and sometimes editorial forum. We present its contents here much as they were emailed to subscribers. Often, links you will see are out of date, and businesses referred to may also be long gone.

In this issue:


If you like what you read here and want more every week, subscribe to BEERWeek. Much of the content within is digested from BEERWeek, the paid subscription supported industry email newsletter. Get your free sample today at

http://www.beerweek.com

 

 

U.K. WANTS ITS OWN LOOK AT INTERBREW-BASS DEAL

Stephen Byers, Great Britain's trade and industry secretary, has requested permission from the European Union to handle the competition review of Interbrew 2.3 billion pound ($3.5 billion) buyout of the Bass brewing business. The deal is being reviewed by the European Commission, the EU's clearinghouse for mergers. An EU member nation can request that a certain review be referred back to it if it believes the deal raises competition concerns within a distinct market in its home territory. "The Director of Fair Trading has advised that the proposed merger raises competition concerns in a distinct market in the U.K. which warrant further investigation. I agree and am therefore requesting the European Commission to refer the case to the U.K.," Beyers said. Belgian-based Interbrew, which acquired Whitbread's brewing business for 400 million in June and would have 32% of the market after buying Bass, declined to comment.

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MILD STYLE ALE HONORED AS BEST BEER IN BRITAIN

Moorhouse's Black Cat was chosen the best beer in Britain during judging by brewers, beer writers and journalists at the Great British Beer Festival in London. The mild beer is described in the 2000 Good Beer Guide as, "A smooth, well-balanced dark mild with a fruity aroma. Chocolate and coffee flavours complement the bitter roast character that lingers on into the aftertaste." The Burnley brewed ale was the first mild in 30 years to be chosen as the Champion Beer. The silver award went to TEA from Hogs Back Brewery in Tongham, Surrey; the bronze to Yorkshire Terrier Bitter from York Brewery. The complete results are at:

http://www.realbeer.com/news/articles/news-001293.php

As one of the judges in the finals, Michael Jackson writes: "I loved its distinctively purply-ruby color; chocolaty aroma; and oily fullness of palate; but found its roasty dryness of finish slightly astringent." Read more about the beers in the final round at:

http://www.beerhunter.com/documents/19133-001295.php

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WHITE SHIELD GOING BACK TO BURTON-ON-TRENT

Worthington White Shield, Britain's most famous bottle-conditioned beer, is going back to Burton-on-Trent, where it will be brewed by Steve Wellington at the Museum Brewing Co. White Shield was first brewed in Burton in the 19th century, and Bass continued to brew White Shield when it merged with Worthington in the 1920s. In the 1990s Bass lost interest in the beer and its sales slumped. Bass took it away from Burton, brewing first in a subsidiary brewery in Sheffield and then at Mitchell & Butler's plant in Birmingham. Then in 1998 it reached an agreement with Sussex independent King & Barnes to brew White Shield at Horsham. The beer was once again under threat when King & Barnes was taken over earlier this year by Hall & Woodhouse, which plans to close the Horsham plant next month. But feverish lobbying by Wellington led to Bass/Interbrew deciding to take the brand back to Burton.

http://www.protzonbeer.com/documents/27660-001206.php

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THOMAS HARDY'S ALE FACES EXTINCTION

Thomas Hardy's Ale, one of the most sought-after strong ales around, may be history. Phoenix Imports, which imports the beer, recently learned that the Thomas Hardy Brewery of Dorchester, England, ceased production of all Eldridge Pope brands. Pope began producing the beer in 1968, and it soon became a cult classic. Each vintage was blended from as many as six different brews and underwent three fermentations. In 1997, Eldridge Pope & Co. sold the Thomas Hardy Brewery to focus on its pubs and wine imports. When Phoenix placed its order for the 2000 vintage, company president George Saxon was told that "because of major changes which have taken place within the Eldridge Pope Management team, Thomas Hardy (Brewery) has ceased production of their major brands. Therefore, Hardy's Ale is no longer available." Phoenix then initiated talks with Eldridge Pope, which retains ownership of the brand, about finding another brewer to produce the beer. Pope has indicated interest, but while talks continue it is obvious there will not be time to brew a 2000 vintage.

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TSINGTAO WILL NOT EXPAND WITH FOSTER'S, MILLER IN CHINA

Despite rumors to the contrary, Tsingtao Brewery Co. recently said Foster's Brewing Group of Australia and U.S. brewer Miller Brewing Company will not figure into its expansion plans. Tsingtao is still negotiating with other foreign brewers. Tsingtao plans to double its market share in China, the second largest beer market in the world, with the help of foreign brewery acquisitions. Regarding the Miller and Foster's rumors, Tsingtao spokesman Zhang Ruixiang said, "We met these two companies only once, and it's irresponsible to say we could form alliances with them." Tsingtao is in negotiations to buy Beijing Asia Shuanghesheng Five Star Brewery Co. and is also speaking to Carlsberg about its unprofitable Shanghai brewery.

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AUSTRALIAN BREWERS CHALLENGE NEW BEER TAX SYSTEM

Australian brewers including Foster's Brewing Group and Lion Nathan have sought legal advice to combat a new 8% tax increase on draft beer. Brewers are paying the new tax "under protest" while they research their options. Both large brewers have been running TV ads criticizing the new taxes, which were raised 8% for draft beer but only 1.9% for packaged beer. The difference is seen in pubs and taverns where the 8% tax is passed on to patrons.

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SMALL BREWERY WINS BIG AT AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL BEER AWARDS

James Squire Beers brewed by the Malt Shovel Brewery were big winners at the 2000 Liquorland Australian International Beer Awards in Melbourne, capturing 10 medals and 4 trophies. The competition attracted 480 entries from 87 companies spanning 25 countries. All three James Squire beers were winners, and James Squire Pilsener received a staggering four gold medals. Samuel Adams beers from the United States and Hoegaarden White of Belgium were among the most honored international beers. Find the trophy winners at:

http://www.sparging.co.nz

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****WEB WATCH****

TASTING 101
We choose to drink a beer for many reasons, but it always serves us well to know all we can about what we are tasting -- if only to help us choose our next beer. This month in Spotlight you'll find a collection of primers on tasting. Learn how you taste, how to talk about what you taste, how to host your own tasting and more.

http://www.realbeer.com/spotlight

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MORE ON BEER APPRECIATION
Beginning in September, we'll offer more tips on beer appreciation in a new weekly newsletter. Beer Break, a concise dispatch intended to take only minutes out of your day, will include tips on beer for novices and aficionados, two or three tasting notes about beers from around the world and a few links to online beer articles. Sign up now and don't miss an issue.

http://www.realbeer.com/library/beerbreak

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IF IT'S BRITISH AND GOOD, LET'S DISMISS IT...
On the eve of the Great British Beer Festival, Michael Jackson offered some forthright opinions on a tough year for Britain's native brews. About Interbrew's proposed acquisition of Bass, he writes: "Bass makes nearly ten million barrels of beer a year but, in its fourth century as a brewer, would rather run bars, restaurants and hotels. Perhaps its beers will be safer in the hands of a company with 'brew' in its name, but don't bet on it."

http://www.beerhunter.com/documents/19133-001297.php

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TAKING NO PRISONERS
This month at World of Beer, Stephen Beaumont writes about "the top five things that piss me off about the world of beer and brewing." We don't want to spoil any surprises....

http://www.worldofbeer.com/features

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THE TASTE!
The British brewing industry, and the British pub, is subject to more change than ever before, and the TASTE! magazine covers all the stories of interest to drinkers. It also never forgets that beer and everything associated with it is actually good fun.

http://www.thetaste.co.uk

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*****************REAL BEER PICKS***************
BEERWAX.COM
Now you can buy candles that look good enough to drink. BeerWax candles come in 16-ounce pint glasses and are available in fragrances such as Spice Pumpkin, Mocha and Lemon. Each candle is hand-poured and topped with a delicious "head" of French Vanilla.

http://www.beerwax.com

BREW TECH INDUSTRIES, INC.
Brew Tech aims to be the king of used equipment - buying, selling and working on consignment. Run by brewers for brewers, BTI works with more than 300 breweries, and 90% of its business is supplying equipment and specialty parts to already existing breweries.

http://www.brewtechinc.com

E. J. WREN HOMEBREWER, INC.
The largest home-brewing supplier in Central New York has high-tech answers for advance hobbyists, but also easy-to-understand advice for first-time brewers. They want to get brewers started, then guide them through their brewing careers. Stop by to see if you qualify for free shipping.

http://www.ejwren.com

HOBBY BEVERAGE EQUIPMENT CO.
Hobby Beverage comes up with creative ways to provide small batch brewing equipment that works just like at larger breweries -- for instance producing the first conical bottom fermentor with all the attributes of a professional fermentor entirely from thermoplastic.

http://www.minibrew.com

PYRAMID LAUNCHES NEW FALL SEASONAL
Pyramid announces the newest addition to its seasonal lineup, Broken Rake Amber Ale. Copper in color and big in taste, this robust well- balanced brew is the perfect yard work companion. To learn more about the new brew and to enter to win an Autumn Adventure to Yellowstone National Park, visit

http://www.pyramidbrokenrake.com/index.php?rbpmail08

RED DOG SALOON
As the oldest man-made tourist attraction in Juneau, Alaska, the Red Dog is synonymous with Alaska. The floors are covered with sawdust, flags are draped from the ceiling, and the walls covered cherished memorabilia of Alaskans: Wyatt Earp's gun, a walrus oosik, trophy wildlife mounts, historical posters and photographs, and currency signed by miners.

http://www.reddogsaloon.cc

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QUICKIE EMAIL SURVEY
Thanks to all who have been replying to our Quickie Surveys. Last month we drew two winners, Mark White and Michael Doyle, who will both receive Real Beer T-shirts. Mark wrote: "I have taken several tours, but the best has to be the Sprecher Brewery in Milwaukee." Michael told us, "Yes. I sometimes will attempt to match beer and grub. The perfect match is to include beer in the recipe though!"

LAST MONTH'S QUESTION:
- Have you ever taken a brewery tour? A full 90% of readers who responded have been on at least one brewery tour. - When you have beer with a meal at home, do you try to match it with what you are eating? Almost 60% of those replying indicate they sometimes pair food and beer, while an equal number responded always as never.

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*********** Brewed Fresh For You! **************

The Real Beer Page announces a diverse group of brew websites to check out:


http://www.californiaconcentrate.com
http://www.houghton.com
http://www.pubtaps.com
http://www.williamsbrewing.com
http://www.contdisc.com
http://www.micropure.com
http://www.primalbrewer.com
http://www.beertrips.com
http://www.dciinc.com
http://www.grapeandgranary.com
http://www.lakefront-brewery.com
http://www.specific.net

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RELABELED PYRAMID HEFEWEIZEN SPARKS SUIT

A class-action lawsuit claims Seattle's Pyramid Brewery is selling Pyramid Hefeweizen under two different names in order to sell beer at a lower price to Washington's top beer retailers. "Pyramid Brewery has done nothing wrong. We intend to vigorously defend this litigation," said Wayne Drury, chief financial officer for Pyramid. The suit charges that Pyramid conspired with a distributor, Alaska Distributors Co., to sell Bavarian Hefeweizen for $70 a keg, instead of the standard $95 a keg for Pyramid Hefeweizen. That deal, however, was only available to Service America Corp., Safeco's vendor, and Host International Inc., concessionaire at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. It is against state law to sell the same beer wholesale at different prices to different retailers. The class-action lawsuit seeks damages for every bar in Washington that sells the regular Hefeweizen.

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AMERICAN BEERS SPARKLE IN TASTE-OFFS

American beers successfully defended their home turf in a series of "Liquid Lunches" and other tasting events during July. Boston Beer Co. sponsored most of the events, including nine of its ongoing Liquid Lunches in cities across the country. A 10th blind tasting was held in Philadelphia in conjunction with "Beer Philadelphia" when American Beer Month kicked off in that city with a variety of events. Generally, each tasting featured three Samuel Adams beers and two local beers against some of the best known and best advertised imports -- and American beers were preferred in most cases. Toronado, one of America's premier beer bars, conducted a slightly different sort of showdown, rating two California beers and two highly regarded British beers in each of three categories. The California beers topped all three categories. Find the complete results and read more about American Beer Month at:

http://www.realbeer.com/spotlight/abm

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A-B TAKES AIM AT KILLIAN'S

Anheuser-Busch is testing a red lager beer in Grand Rapids, Mich., and could make the beer a national product by next year. "Advertising Age" reports that Killarney is brewed with Irish whiskey and brewers malts. It will compete with George Killian's Irish Red Lager, marketed by Coors Brewing Co. Killian's is the No. 2 domestically brewed "superpremium regular" beer, after A-B's Michelob. A-B started testing Killarney's on tap in late February. It reportedly plans to expand the test later this year, including a bottled product. A-B launched three reds beers in 1994 -- Red Wolf Lager, Elephant Red and Elk Mountain Red Lager -- but since dropped the latter two.

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DOS EQUIS FOLLOWS CORONA'S LEAD IN CANS

Mexican brewer and bottler Femsa has become the second Mexican brewer this summer to expand its line of canned beer, making Dos Equis Lager available in cans for the first time and supplementing its 12-ounce Tecate cans with a 16-ounce version. Grupo Modelo earlier announced it would begin selling its popular Corona beer in cans in the United States. Previously, Corona, the No. 1 import in the U.S., was available only in bottles.

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5,000 YEARS OF DRINKING CULTURE CELEBRATED IN NEW YORK

"Drink and Be Merry: Wine and Beer in Ancient Times" at the Jewish Museum in New York City until Nov. 5 showcases more than 180 objects including art, artifacts and paraphernalia of the wine and beer trade. Organized by the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, this exhibition explores two of the oldest known beverages, valued throughout time for their abilities to lift spirits, inspire religious fervor, deaden pain and cure illness. The Jewish Museum is located at 1109 Fifth Ave. at 92nd Street.

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CLASSIC BEER POSTERS IN ST. LOUIS

The St. Louis Library is featuring an international traveling exhibition of historic beer posters from the collection of Heinrich Becker of Cologne, Germany, through Sept. 16. This is the only showing in North America. About 50 posters are on display Monday through Friday at the Central Library, and 100 different ones are presented Monday through Sunday at the St. Louis Merchatile Library. The exhibit is sponsored by St. Louis Brewery/Schlafly Beer. Schlafly's summer seasonal beer is a Kolsch using yeast flown in from Becker's Gaffel Braueri in Cologne.

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BRAND STUDY SINGLES OUT BUDWEISER, COORS LIGHT

The strength of the Budweiser and Coors Light brands stood out in a recent customer loyalty survey conducted by Brand Keys, a New York- based research firm. The study probed customers' relationships with 129 brands in 24 categories, ranging from mobile-telephone manufacturers to diet soft drinks to online brokerages. Budweiser rated No. 1 in the beer category, while Coors Light was tops in light beer. Coors Light is the nation's third best selling light beer, behind Bud Light and Miller Lite.

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EDITORIAL: ON FRESH BEER AND POTATO CHIPS

Most microbrewers visiting the Utz potato chip factory in Hanover, Pa., would feel right at home.

Although the facility is bigger than all but a few micros and Utz has more employees, in the potato chip world Utz is a small batch producer. The potatoes are carefully selected, then inspected before slicing, after cooking and all along the way. The plant combines high-tech machinery and hands-on human guidance.

The emphasis, in the end, is on quality and freshness. Sound familiar?

A key difference between Utz and microbreweries, though, is what happens after the chips leave the production area. They remain in Utz's control. Utz distributes snack foods in 10 Eastern states, from New York to North Carolina, with sales people taking orders one day and Utz trucks often delivering fresh shipments the next. The company estimates that 90% of its chips are eaten within a week of when they are made.

It's against the law for breweries to do the same thing. One of the legacies of Prohibition is the three-tier system, which requires that breweries go through middlemen, in this case distributors, who sell beer (and other alcoholic products) to retailers.

As a result, a salesman for High Krausen Brewing Co. can't stop in your favorite tavern or beer store, find out that supplies of High Krausen Pilsner are running low and promise the owner that a batch will be delivered fresh from the brewery the next day. And if you buy a 6-pack of HK Pilsner that smells of Band-Aids, you don't know if you should blame the brewer or a truck driver employed by somebody else who left it in the sun on a loading dock during his lunch break.

Is this fair? No. Don't producers and consumers both benefit when a producer is allowed to make sure its products are sold under the best conditions? Yet as much as we like the idea of freshness and local control, we know the law isn't going to change. If you care about your beer as much as your potato chips, however, there are things you can do to help High Krausen and other breweries.

- When you find old and abused products at bars and in retail stores, politely inform both the bar or storeowner and the brewery. Good bars and stores appreciate educated customers.

- Reward the bars and stores that take good care of beer with your business. Perhaps the store down the street is selling High Krausen at $1 less per 6-pack because the owner is pushing old stock.

It's that simple -- expect freshness and quality and be willing to pay for it.

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