Canadian beer industry ‘disappearing’

May 14th, 2007 | Posted by Real Beer

Steven Poirier, president of Moosehead Breweries, sounded an alarm about the future of Canadian brewing in a speech delivered Monday.

‘‘Close to 90 per cent of all beer sold in Canada today is controlled by foreign brewers,’’ Poirier said. Moosehead is now the largest independent Canadian brewery, with just 5.5% of national beer sales.

Poirier said the three fastest growing beer brands in Canada are U.S. brands.

‘‘Are we destined to become the largest consumers of American beer outside the United States? From our perspective it certainly appears so,’’ he says.

The story.

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3 Responses to “Canadian beer industry ‘disappearing’”

  1. Greg Says:

    Canadians, like myself, need only to turn to themselves to find EXCELLENT beer at home without having to support foreign brewers. My favorite brand is Camerons which is an Ontario brewery and brews 3 types of premium beer at reasonable (same price as that cruddy Labatts crap or that Old Mulewakee) price. I can name many others such as Steam Whistle for example, that are EXCELLENT if only more Canadians would break free from the Labatts/Molson sludge. EXPLORE!!!!! Americans brew fine beers such as Sam Adams, but they also brew allot of “production” line beers that aren’t fit to be consumed by cattle…they just have great marketting. Try a Yankee Jim to see what I mean. We have some real losers here too. SUPPORT THE LITTLE GUY!!! Try them out and you will see.

  2. Tomoko Says:

    This is terrible! I was born in Canada (live in the USA now), and I cut my “beer teeth” on Moosehead. Looks as if I need to give more support to brews from the Great White North. At least I can find Unibroue in Atlanta, and I will keep my eyes peeled for others.

  3. christopher Says:

    Mixed feelings on this one. I live in British Columbia, and there are many craft brewers, brew pubs, etc. that are thriving, based on the growing numbers of people who seek out beer that is superior to generally tasteless lagers. But a vast majority of beer drinkers will always want to drink tasteless lager, and I think that sucks and is lame based on my own tastes, but if they don’t, and it makes them happy, then what will I do? Tell them their tastes are wrong? Whatever. Craft breweries will continue to thrive, but the potential is limited — just check out http://www.beer.com!!! (shame about Brick, up for sale in Ontario, though)