New style: IPA meets Hefeweizen

May 30th, 2006 | Posted by Real Beer

San Juan Brewing Co./Front Street Ale House in Washington has laid claiming to creating a new beer style: Ipa-weizen (prounced Ippa-weizen).

From the press release:

Remember back in the day, when Hefe-weizen was the beer to be quaffing? People’s tastes have changed over the years, now the brew to drink is I.P.A., even extra strength or double hopped IPAs. Not that we dwell on such things, but in a recent conversation about beer and such, an idea floated by, slowed down for a second, and a bit of it stuck. Why not combine the best of a crisp, fully hopped IPA, and the refreshing flavors of the summer’s first hefe-weizen, all in the same glass?

The resulting beer is fermented with Bavarian weizen yeast and hopped generously with both German and English varieties.

They named it

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4 Responses to “New style: IPA meets Hefeweizen”

  1. chris Says:

    I’ll try anything once, but my initial thoughts would be that the fruit & spice from the Bavarian yeast would be battling the spice & fruit from the hops (depending on variety). If it is balanced, I applaud them.

    Chris
    Biere De Table

  2. SteveH Says:

    Bavarian style Hefeweizen, or American style? And, have they talked with Three Floyds about their Gumballhead? I’ve been calling this a cross between an APA and an American Wheat since I tried it a long time ago.

    S.

  3. Hark Says:

    excellent point Steve! Gumballhead is one hoppy Wheat beer! A perennial favorite.

  4. Jay Brooks Says:

    Im pretty sure Marin Brewing’s Hefe Doppel Weizen and their Star Brew Wheatwine Triple What Ale are generously hopped and stronger in a manner similar to what their press release suggests. Plus, Marin is not the only brewery to brew a Wheatwine, a few others have as well. Nothing against San Juan Brewing, I spent the second half of my honeymoon in a cabin on San Juan Island and enjoyed their beers many times, especially a Juniper Stout, which I remember quite fondly.

    J
    Brookston Beer Bulletin